Call for Papers: Song Studies

The Amsterdam Centre for Cross-Disciplinary Emotion and Sensory Studies and THALIA, research group on the Interplay of Theatre, Literature & Media in Performance, present:

SONG STUDIES 2020

EXPLORING INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES TO SONGS AND PRACTICES OF SINGING (1200-TODAY)

Ghent University, 1-3 July 2020

Keynote speaker: Monique Scheer (Tübingen University)

Call for papers

The singing voice is a medium of expression that is found in all times and cultures. People have always been singing, not only to perform entertainingly, but also to express emotions or to embody identities. This has for example made collective singing (and listening) practices a primary way for people to articulate and embody the identities that are fundamental to the existence of social groups. The bodily and sensory experience of moving and sounding together in synchrony, enables individuals to experience feelings of togetherness with others.

Song is the versatile medium facilitating such processes. Songs can evoke and channel emotions, employing them for specific (or less specific) means. As a multimodal genre, song enables not only the articulation and embodiment of ideas; as an inherently oral and intangible medium, songs can move through space and time, transgressing any material form. Therefore, songs have proven an ideal tool for the distribution of news, contentious ideas, or mobilising messages.

This conference aims to bring together researchers from various disciplines investigating song (for example musicology, literary studies, history, sociology, performance studies, cognition studies, anthropology, etc.). The focus will be on the definition of possible approaches to the study of this medium (both in its material and performed existence), its performances (in any form) and reception (in any context). Research examples may cover songs written and sung in any culture and language, and any (historical) period. Common ground will be found through concepts, approaches and methodologies, encouraging an interdisciplinary and transhistorical dialogue, breaking ground for a new research field: song studies.

Possible research areas and questions to be explored are:
– how to study the multimodality of the genre, acknowledging both textual and musical characteristics, and its performative nature;
– the sensory/bodily and emotional/affective experience of listening and singing;
– cognitive and/or affective processes of singing (and collective singing practices);
– how to study the performative aspects of songs in historical contexts;
– the ‘power’/agency of song;
– the role of song and singing in social processes and historical developments; etc.

We invite proposals for 20-minute individual papers (max. 300 words) or alternative formats (pre-submission inquiry is encouraged). As the aim of this conference is to facilitate dialogue, there will be ample time for discussion and exchange. Please send your proposal, including your name, academic affiliation and a short biographical note, no later than 20 December 2019 to renee.vulto@ugent.be.

For more information, visit: https://www.songstudies.ugent.be/

De ballen van de koopman

Dorothee Sturkenboom

Mannelijkheid en Nederlandse identiteit in de tijd van de Republiek

Wordt verwacht in april 2019

Als buitenlanders aan Nederlanders denken, luidt de favoriete conclusie: het zijn koopmannen.
Dorothee Sturkenboom duikt diep de Gouden Eeuw in om de oorsprong van dat beeld te achterhalen én de bijbehorende ideeën over de mannelijkheid van deze kooplieden. Daarbij stuit ze op fascinerende tegenstellingen: Nederlanders worden neergezet als solide in de wereld van het geld maar weinig weerbaar wanneer het op oorlog voeren aankomt. Als superieur in het handeldrijven maar onder de plak van hun echtgenotes. Als tolerant en zachtmoedig met klanten maar onbuigzaam en hardvochtig in de omgang met volkeren overzee. De Nederlandse handelsidentiteit wordt gekenmerkt door een combinatie van zachtere en hardere stijlen van mannelijkheid.Met De ballen van de koopman levert Sturkenboom een verrassende en vernieuwende bijdrage aan de discussie in Nederland over identiteit.

Dorothee Sturkenboom is historicus. Na een twintigjarige loopbaan aan de universiteiten van Nijmegen, Los Angeles en Amsterdam werkt zij nu als onafhankelijk onderzoeker.COVERS3D.ballen

Conference: Imagineering Violence. Spectacle and Print in the Early Modern Period

poster ITEMP compressedHow can violence be represented and imagined? How can an artist document the violence of the times? What about the numerous ethical implications? When does a spectator become a voyeur? When does violence turn into spectacle? Can violence be aestheticized? Does an artist have a duty to document contemporary violence? These questions saturate modern art, from the horrors of War in Goya to the racial violence in Edward and Nancy Kienholz’s ‘Five Car Stud’. However, they are not new in themselves. The early modern period witnessed a true explosion of images on pain, suffering and violence across painting, print, theater, and public space. The public had plenty to choose from: sieges, executions, massacres: violence fascinated the early modern spectator, yet it simultaneously conjured up numerous questions, some of which are not unlike those posed today.

Together, historians and artists explore the early modern period, looking for new answers on the questions that concern us in the present by means of lectures, artistic presentations, and round table talks. Together, they will investigate how artists in the early modern period dealt with the violence of their time, and whether these age-old answers might shine a light on today’s ‘spectacle society’.

With artistic works by, amongst others,  Stef Lernous van Abattoir Fermé, Simon Pummell, Doina Kraal, Jan Rosseel, Enkidu Khaled, e.a. and lectures by internationally renowned cultural historians such as Jonathan Davies, Katie Hornstein and Benjamin Schmidt.

Find the short program here, and the poster here.

For the Huizinga Institute masterclass by Benjamin Schmidt (currently fully booked, with waiting list), see: https://www.huizingainstituut.nl/masterclass-by-benjamin-schmidt-violent-images-in-the-in-early-modern-period/

Workshop Sex and Science in Early Modern Europe

22 February 2019

Sex is a relatively recent invention. Reproduction isintrinsic in human beings, yet sex and sexuality are conceptual constructions of later ages. In the early modern period physicians, anatomists, philosophers and literary authors became fascinated by human desire and sexual behavior. Diving into classical texts, humanists collected ancient knowledge about love and lust. Pornographers catalogued sexual variations to arouse desire. The scientific revolution and early enlightenment encouraged innovative experiments and new theories on desire and reproduction.

CLUE+ and ACCESS (Amsterdam Center for Cross-disciplinary Emotion and Sensory Studies) invite you to a one-day Workshop on Sex and Science in Early Modern Europe. How did scholars define sex and envision its place in our bodies and minds? What knowledge techniques did they employ to gather information about sexual acts and the reproductive system? An international, interdisciplinary panel of speakers, will explore these topics and debate the agenda for further research on the history of sexuality in early modern Europe.

Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam,

Main building 08A33

Friday 22 February 2019, 9-17h

Registration is free. To sign up, email: k.e.hollewand@uu.nl

 

 

 

 

 

9.00 – 9.30 Registration & Coffee
   
9.30 – 11.00 Karen Hollewand (Utrecht University) – Opening Lecture

Sex and Science in the Early Modern Dutch Republic

   

Nigel Smith (Princeton) – Focquen-wat? Libertine Literature and Cultural Revolution Through the Dutch Republic

   
11.00 – 11.30 Coffee /tea
   
11.30 – 13.00 Clorinda Donato (California State University) – Writing Desire, Lust, and Science in Eighteenth-Century Italy: Giovanni Bianchi’s Brief History of Caterina Vizzani, 1744
  Sarah Toulalan (University of Exeter) – Child Rape and Sexual Knowledge
   
13.00 – 14.00 Lunch
   
14.00 – 15.30 Ruben Verwaal (University of Groningen) – Seminal Knowledge: Materiality of Semen in the Eighteenth Century
   

Darren Wagner (University of Berlin) – When Sex became Electric: Experiment and Representation in the Eighteenth Century

   
15.30 – 16.00 Coffee / tea
   
16.00 – 17.00 Inger Leemans (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) – Discussion and conclusion
 

Drinks