Early modern emotions: two new book publications

Two exciting new books on early emotions have recently been published, both with connections to ACCESS.

Early Modern Emotions: An Introduction, edited by Susan Broomhall, is a student-friendly introduction to the concepts, approaches and sources used to study emotions in early modern Europe, and to the perspectives that analysis of the history of emotions can offer early modern studies more broadly. The book contains chapters by ACCESS members Erika Kuijpers, Inger Leemans, and Herman Roodenburg. For more information, the table of contents – and to order the book for your university library –  please visit the Routledge catalogue.

Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by ACCESS members Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, was published in Palgrave’s Studies in the History of Emotions series. The collection, resulting from the international workshops on battlefield emotions, explores changes in emotional cultures of the early modern battlefield. Integrating psychological, social and cultural perspectives, it explores emotional behaviour, expression and representation in a great variety of primary source material.

 

ISCH Conference Senses, Emotions and the Affective Turn

The next annual conference of the International Society for Cultural History will be held in Umeå, Sweden, 26-29 June, 2017. The general theme this year is ‘Senses, Emotions and the Affective Turn – Recent Perspectives and New Challenges in Cultural History.’

Confirmed keynote speaker: Barbara H. Rosenwein

Please submit papers for panels or the plenary roundtable before 19 December 2017.

Call for Papers ISCH 2017 Umeå

CFP: International and Interdisciplinary Conference on the Emotions in Sydney

First International Conference on Contemporary and Historical Approaches to Emotions

Date: 5-6 December 2016
Hosts: The University of Wollongong (UOW) Contemporary Emotions Research Network (CERN), the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions (CHE), and The Australian Sociological Association Sociology of Emotions and Affect Thematic Group (TASA SEA)
Venue: UOW Sydney CBD Campus (Circular Quay, Sydney, Australia)

The conference will bring together researchers working in the area of emotions in contemporary and historical societies from a range of disciplines for the first time, including sociology, philosophy, politics, law, history, literature, creative arts and media. It will showcase cutting-edge research from international experts on approaches to studying emotions from across these fields. We are interested in receiving and papers for presentation in expert panels and general sessions on (but not limited to) the following topics:

Emotions in space and place;
The expression and function of emotions such as shame, anxiety, and anger in contemporary society;
The relationship between emotions, embodiment, and affect;
Emotion management in inter-personal relationships
Methodologies for researching emotions;
The role of emotions in social change;
Emotions in work and professional life;
Emotions and care work
Emotions in the public sphere
Emotions in education
Emotions and law
The philosophy of emotions
The history of emotions
The creative and literary expression of emotions;
Emotions and culture

Please submit a 500-word panel proposal, or a 200 word abstract for an individual paper to cern-admin@uow.edu.au by Friday 1 July 2016. For more information, and for updates about keynote speakers and other conference related information, please visit the CERN events page.

Convened by: Roger Patulny and Sukhmani Khorana (UOW CERN), Andrew Lynch (ARC CHE) and Rebecca Olson and Jordan McKenzie (TASA SEA).

[Book] Silence – essays on culture, power and change

STILTE‘Silence’ is trending. Ever more people embrace silence as a way of escaping the pressures of daily life. Yet silence itself is not new; it has a long and sometimes painful history. This book tries to capture the many faces of silence as a historical phenomenon. Dealing with topics such as art, trauma, migration, politics and education it addresses the history, cultural diversity and cultural force of silence.

Pieter Verstraete is a lecturer in Historical Pedagogy in the department of Education, Culture and Society of the University of Louvain. He has authored many books, including In the Shadow of Disability and Verminkte stilte. He was awarded with the Disability History Association Outstanding Book Award for his book The Imperfect Historian.

Josephine Hoegaerts is a postdoctoral researcher in the research group ‘Modernity and Society 1750-2000’ at the University of Louvain and the Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies. Her research focuses on the social history of the human voice in Western-Europe.

More information on the book can be found here.

Call for Papers: Workshop Gender and Silence in Leuven

HUSHED (HI)STORIES OF POWER AND RESILIENCE IN THE FACE OF MODERNITY.

LEUVEN, 7 NOVEMBER 2014 9-16h
Abstract deadline: 1 July 2014

Key-note address: MARIE BUSCATTO (Univ. Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne)

Can silence articulate gender? It seems so insubstantial and eerie – the mere absence of sound. It is easy to forget that silence can consist of an active practice, which is being carried out consciously by numerous actors in the past as well as the present. Active silence has been enforced (“mulier taceat in ecclesia”), used as a means of protest (Turkey’s ‘standing man’s protests) and has been designated as an attribute of dignity or calm. In all those guises, active silence serves as a way to signal the non-speaker’s relation to power, and to underline the corporeal and performative nature of the distribution of (acoustic) authority: female silence in church signaled respect for religious discipline, the ‘standing man’ shows resilience in the face of violence, and dignified silence is a privilege reserved for adults.

This workshop aims to explore the ambiguous relation between practices of silence and gendered identities. Rather than assuming an association between voice and power, and silence and obedience, it seeks to encourage a nuanced analysis of the different ways in which silence has been mobilized or can be mobilized in shaping gendered bodies and behaviors. In teasing out hushed (hi)stories, participants are invited to focus on the perspective of the active non- speaker.

We welcome papers that address issues including (but not limited to) the following:

  • Gendered modes of contemplative silence (monastic or otherwise), discourses and practices of silence and gender in religion and devotion
  • Active silence in contexts of protest, and its gendered meanings and implications
  • Silence as protection (e.g. rapevictims, practices of ‘passing’)
  • Silence and compliance (enforced silence, institutional silence)
  • Representations of gender and silence in literature, art, theatre, (audiovisual) media…
  • Silence and gender in music

Abstracts and papers can be sent in Dutch, English or French. We require participants to hold their oral presentation in English during the workshop.

Interested participants can send an abstract of max.300 words and a short biographical outline by 1 July to josephine.hoegaerts@arts.kuleuven.be

More information in this pdf file

Application Call Moral Economies Research School

The International Max Planck Research School for Moral Economies of Modern Societies are starting a new PhD program in october 2013. It focuses on identifying which kind of values, emotions and habits inform and inspire the social formations that have emerged since the eighteenth century. The School sets out to investigate how ‘moral economies’ were composed, organized and practiced in the last three centuries.

Masterstudents who are interested can apply until the 5th of december. See for more information the flyer or visit the website.

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