Call for Papers: Conflict and the Senses in the Global Cold War

International Workshop
“Conflict and the Senses in the Global Cold War: From Propaganda to Sensory Warfare”
Berlin Center for Cold War Studies at the Leibniz Institute for Contemporary History (IfZ)
in cooperation with Stiftung Luftbrückendank and Stiftung Ernst-Reuter-Archiv Berlin
15–16.10.2020 in Berlin

CfP Workshop Conflict and the Senses in Global Cold War BKKK 2020

Although a conflict in which military strategies and weapons of mass destruction were always on the “horizon of expectation”, the Cold War was to a large degree carried out by non-lethal methods. It was also a war of culture, politics, and (visual and sonic) propaganda. Therefore, it can be understood to a great extent as a war not only on the senses, but as a war through the senses. In recent times, sensory aspects of domestic and international conflicts have become a field of interest in both sensory studies and conflict studies, with their methods and questionnaires intertwining in fruitful cooperation. Historiographical approaches include the study of conflicts from the American Civil War to the Russian Revolution to both World Wars, and these examine how wars as the most extreme form of conflict were perceived—and how war changed contemporary perception. The central conflict of the second half of the 20th century, though, is still a blatantly unexplored area in terms of sensory approaches.

Steve Goodman has described how sound was used to carry out conflict—in propaganda, crowd control, and even in military practice and torture. Extending his term “sonic warfare” to “sensory warfare”, the workshop aims to discuss sensory aspects of the global Cold War—from sonic and visual propaganda to military forms of conflict in the “hot” wars of the Cold War in Korea or Vietnam.

What techniques were developed to attack the enemy with non-lethal and lethal weapons, ranging from irritation to the deadly use of chemicals aimed at the respiratory organs of the enemy? How were the senses trained to motivate the masses into a state of alert, for example, through sonic signals? What sensory methods were used to gain intelligence and information? What were the “micro politics” and affective measures used to influence people unconsciously, with the aim of dividing them into political communities of different perceptions, for example, in gustatory preferences? How did the Cold War not only use but also change perception as a result of division?

Papers may address (among other topics) aspects of:

– sonic and visual propaganda (e.g., at the borders of Germany, Korea, or Vietnam);
– cultural politics aimed at a Western/Eastern way of seeing, hearing, etc.;
– taste politics, as in “Americanized” vs. “Sovietized” and how this pertains to the global context concerning nutrition (e.g., airdrops of chocolate and chewing gum during the Berlin Airlift);
– spatial analysis of Cold War sense scapes;
– the “built view”, as in political architectures of transparency, centralism, or power;
– military measures aimed at perception organs (such as gas, and sonic and visual weapons);
– plans for “ecocide” or environmental weapons;
– sensory training and sensitization for both soldiers and civilians (altered states, e.g., by learning sonic signals);
– sensory methods of intelligence;
– the use of animal sensoria for warfare, border control and political policing;
– sensory warfare in domestic political conflicts of the Cold War (e.g., tear gas or olfactory forensics);
– sense aspects of human rights discourse, such as in detention and torture (e.g., pain, sensory deprivation);
– haptic aspects such as war toys or industrial design (from Sputnik to the red button);
– other everyday life aspects of the Cold War, such as how it affected music, gastronomy, perfumery;
– “new senses” like equilibrioception or pain control (e.g., in air force and other military training);
– transcontinental sensory aspects of the Cold War’s proxy wars (Africa, Asia, South America); or
– the Cold War and the senses in the museum.

By addressing these topics, the conference aims to apply perspectives from the internationally emerging field of sensory studies to Cold War history—and the other way around—with a clear focus on perception. We are seeking to gain general knowledge about how to apply sensory approaches to a concrete historical phenomenon and we seek to understand the sensory aspects of the Cold War in everyday life, as well as border areas of warfare in the 20th century.

Therefore, scholars from both sensory studies and history/conflict studies are encouraged to submit proposals. While understanding perception within its intersensorial dimensions, we do welcome both multisensorial resp. intersensory papers as well as such papers limited to a single sensory perception, especially to those senses that have been studied less.

Please tender submissions in the form of short and comprehensive proposals with an emphasis on the sensory aspect of your paper. The conference language is English and our intention is to subsequently publish the proceedings.

Each proposal should include:

– the author’s name and affiliation,
– email address,
– an abstract of no more than 350 words, and
– a short biography (no more than 150 words).

Please submit proposals to Dr. Bodo Mrozek: mrozek [at] ifz-muenchen.de by the deadline of 31 May 2020. The program will be announced by June 2020.

Early modern emotions: two new book publications

Two exciting new books on early emotions have recently been published, both with connections to ACCESS.

Early Modern Emotions: An Introduction, edited by Susan Broomhall, is a student-friendly introduction to the concepts, approaches and sources used to study emotions in early modern Europe, and to the perspectives that analysis of the history of emotions can offer early modern studies more broadly. The book contains chapters by ACCESS members Erika Kuijpers, Inger Leemans, and Herman Roodenburg. For more information, the table of contents – and to order the book for your university library –  please visit the Routledge catalogue.

Battlefield Emotions 1500-1800: Practices, Experience, Imagination, edited by ACCESS members Erika Kuijpers and Cornelis van der Haven, was published in Palgrave’s Studies in the History of Emotions series. The collection, resulting from the international workshops on battlefield emotions, explores changes in emotional cultures of the early modern battlefield. Integrating psychological, social and cultural perspectives, it explores emotional behaviour, expression and representation in a great variety of primary source material.

 

ISCH Conference Senses, Emotions and the Affective Turn

The next annual conference of the International Society for Cultural History will be held in Umeå, Sweden, 26-29 June, 2017. The general theme this year is ‘Senses, Emotions and the Affective Turn – Recent Perspectives and New Challenges in Cultural History.’

Confirmed keynote speaker: Barbara H. Rosenwein

Please submit papers for panels or the plenary roundtable before 19 December 2017.

Call for Papers ISCH 2017 Umeå

CFP: International and Interdisciplinary Conference on the Emotions in Sydney

First International Conference on Contemporary and Historical Approaches to Emotions

Date: 5-6 December 2016
Hosts: The University of Wollongong (UOW) Contemporary Emotions Research Network (CERN), the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions (CHE), and The Australian Sociological Association Sociology of Emotions and Affect Thematic Group (TASA SEA)
Venue: UOW Sydney CBD Campus (Circular Quay, Sydney, Australia)

The conference will bring together researchers working in the area of emotions in contemporary and historical societies from a range of disciplines for the first time, including sociology, philosophy, politics, law, history, literature, creative arts and media. It will showcase cutting-edge research from international experts on approaches to studying emotions from across these fields. We are interested in receiving and papers for presentation in expert panels and general sessions on (but not limited to) the following topics:

Emotions in space and place;
The expression and function of emotions such as shame, anxiety, and anger in contemporary society;
The relationship between emotions, embodiment, and affect;
Emotion management in inter-personal relationships
Methodologies for researching emotions;
The role of emotions in social change;
Emotions in work and professional life;
Emotions and care work
Emotions in the public sphere
Emotions in education
Emotions and law
The philosophy of emotions
The history of emotions
The creative and literary expression of emotions;
Emotions and culture

Please submit a 500-word panel proposal, or a 200 word abstract for an individual paper to cern-admin@uow.edu.au by Friday 1 July 2016. For more information, and for updates about keynote speakers and other conference related information, please visit the CERN events page.

Convened by: Roger Patulny and Sukhmani Khorana (UOW CERN), Andrew Lynch (ARC CHE) and Rebecca Olson and Jordan McKenzie (TASA SEA).