Conference: Imagineering Violence. Spectacle and Print in the Early Modern Period

poster ITEMP compressedHow can violence be represented and imagined? How can an artist document the violence of the times? What about the numerous ethical implications? When does a spectator become a voyeur? When does violence turn into spectacle? Can violence be aestheticized? Does an artist have a duty to document contemporary violence? These questions saturate modern art, from the horrors of War in Goya to the racial violence in Edward and Nancy Kienholz’s ‘Five Car Stud’. However, they are not new in themselves. The early modern period witnessed a true explosion of images on pain, suffering and violence across painting, print, theater, and public space. The public had plenty to choose from: sieges, executions, massacres: violence fascinated the early modern spectator, yet it simultaneously conjured up numerous questions, some of which are not unlike those posed today.

Together, historians and artists explore the early modern period, looking for new answers on the questions that concern us in the present by means of lectures, artistic presentations, and round table talks. Together, they will investigate how artists in the early modern period dealt with the violence of their time, and whether these age-old answers might shine a light on today’s ‘spectacle society’.

With artistic works by, amongst others,  Stef Lernous van Abattoir Fermé, Simon Pummell, Doina Kraal, Jan Rosseel, Enkidu Khaled, e.a. and lectures by internationally renowned cultural historians such as Jonathan Davies, Katie Hornstein and Benjamin Schmidt.

Find the short program here, and the poster here.

For the Huizinga Institute masterclass by Benjamin Schmidt (currently fully booked, with waiting list), see: https://www.huizingainstituut.nl/masterclass-by-benjamin-schmidt-violent-images-in-the-in-early-modern-period/

Uitreiking van de erepenning van Teylers Tweede Genootschap op vrijdag 28 september 2018

UITNODIGING

 

Directeuren van Teylers Stichting hebben het genoegen u uit te nodigen voor de uitreiking van de erepenning van Teylers Tweede Genootschap op vrijdag 28 september 2018 om 16.00 uur in de gehoorzaal van Teylers Museum, Spaarne 16 te Haarlem.

In 2015 heeft prof. dr. Niek van Sas, hoogleraar geschiedenis na 1750, Universiteit van Amsterdam en lid van Teylers Tweede Genootschap, de prijsvraag geformuleerd met de titel: “Gevraagd wordt: een studie op het terrein van de emotie-geschiedenis, toegepast op een onderwerp uit de Nederlandse geschiedenis (Middeleeuwen tot heden)”.

De leden van het Tweede Genootschap en Directeuren van Teylers Stichting hebben een gouden penning toegekend aan de inzending onder het motto “het zien gaat voor het zeggen” met de begeleidende teksten “De ‘History of Emotions’ in het Nederlandstalige toneel van de zeventiende eeuw”, “Woelen en kroelen op het toneel: ongewenst?”, “Gezongen emoties. Toneelliederen in Rodenburghs Vrou Iacoba bij de opening van de nieuwe Schouwburg”, “Spain’s dramatic conquest of the Dutch Republic. Rodenburgh as a literary mediator of Spanish theatre”, “Vrouwenmoord in Vondels Gysbreght.”.

De auteurs zijn:

Dr. Olga van Marion en Timothy Vergeer M.A.

 

Het programma is als volgt:

  1. Opening door prof. dr. Sjoerd Verduyn Lunel, presiderend Directeur van Teylers Stichting.
  2. Toelichting op het judicium door prof. dr. Niek van Sas.
  3. Uitreiking van de erepenning.
  4. Voordracht door dr. Olga van Marion en Timothy Vergeer M.A. over hun inzending.
  5. Sluiting door prof. dr. Sjoerd Verduyn Lunel.

Hierna is er gelegenheid de bekroonden geluk te wensen in de tuinzaal van het museum.

Vóór de bijeenkomst zal vanaf 15.30 uur thee en koffie worden geschonken op de omloop bij de gehoorzaal op de eerste verdieping van het museum.

Indien u deze bijeenkomst wilt bijwonen, kunt u zich aanmelden door een e-mail te sturen uiterlijk vóór 10 september naar teylersstichting@teylersmuseum.nl

Teylers Museum is ongeveer 15 minuten lopen van het station Haarlem.

Parkeren is mogelijk in de naast het museum gelegen parkeergarage “De Appelaar”.

 

TEYLERS STICHTING

Haarlem, augustus 2018

www.teylersstichting.nl

Lecture on Consolation and the Culture of Protestantism in Early Modern England

On Wednesday, October 19th at 17:00, dr. Jan Frans van Dijkhuizen (University of Leiden) will present new research in his talk ‘”Never Better”: Consolation and the Culture of Protestantism in Early Modern England’.

The talk will take place at the University of Amsterdam, in P.C. Hoofthuis room 1.05, Spuistraat 134, Amsterdam.

“Never Better”: Consolation and the Culture of Protestantism in Early Modern England
In this talk I will look at the crucial role of consolation in the culture of early modern English Protestantism. Protestants were preoccupied by the idea of consolation, and felt that the true Christian community is defined by the ways in which it understands and practices consolation. This interest in consolation was occasioned in part by the importance of persecution and martyrdom for early modern notions of Protestant identity, yet the dominance of consolation in early modern Protestant culture extended beyond this. Members of the Protestant clergy were interested in suffering more broadly, and undertook a massive effort – in a diverse genre best labeled ‘religious consolation literature’ – to instruct their flock in the meanings of suffering, and to shape their responses to affliction.

I will map some of the dominant tropes in this literature, showing that consolation was always a deeply politically fraught concept. Throughout the early modern era, this political dimension of Protestant consolation remained a potential to be activated by various Protestant factions alike, from ardent conformists to radical Puritans. I will also examine how consolation literature was put to use by early modern Protestant individuals. By turning to the notebooks of the London wood turner Nehemiah Wallington (1598–1658), I will show that consolation could be a frustratingly open-ended, potentially endless enterprise. While consolation is a central strand in Wallington, it never seems to attain its goal; it never enables Wallington to confer definitive meaning on his suffering.

About

Jan Frans van Dijkhuizen teaches English Literature at the University of Leiden. He is the author of Pain and Compassion in Early Modern English Literature and Culture (Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 2012) and Devil Theatre: Demonic Possession and Exorcism in English Renaissance Drama, 1558–1642 (Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 2007), and has co- edited The Sense of Suffering: Constructions of Physical Pain in Early Modern Culture (Leiden: Brill, 2009) and The Reformation Unsettled: British Literature and the Question of Religious Identity, 1560–1660 (Turnhout: Brepols, 2008). He is currently preparing a third monograph, entitled A Literary History of Reconciliation: Remorse and the Limits of Forgiveness, which is under contract for 2018 with Bloomsbury Academic. He spent most of the spring and summer of this year as a Short-Term Research Fellow at the Folger Shakespeare Library, where he worked on the role of consolation in the culture of early modern English Protestantism. He is hoping to write a book on this topic in the not too distant future.

Lecture and Workshop Michael Schoenfeld

The Leiden University Centre for the Arts in Society (Lucas)

presents a guest lecture by

Michael Schoenfeldt

John Knott Professor of English, University of Michigan

on

Lessons from the Body:

Disability, Deformity, and Disease in Shakespeare

Wednesday 6 April, 16.15, Vossius Room, Leiden University Library

All welcome!

lear

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Workshop: Emotion and Subjectivity

Emotion and Subjectivity, 1300-1900
Workshop at NIAS (Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study) September 29-30, 2014

crying womanThe workshop brings together scholars from the Netherlands, Germany and the UK, who are working on various historical and literary approaches to the study of emotions. During two days in Wassenaar, participants will explore the ways in which emotions have been placed in dialogue with sociocultural values and political discourse throughout the period 1300-1900. The workshop primarily engages with emotion in a European context and so will raise questions about national stereotypes and emotions, as well as the possibility of characterizing a ‘European’ selfhood.

In their papers, participating scholars explore emotional rhetoric in a range of texts, such as medical and scientific tracts, visual art, music, theatre, literature, historiography, and war reporting. Individual topics range from medieval medicine to midwifery manuals of the eighteenth-century to the emotional appeal of opera in the nineteenth century. All workshop participants are invested in understanding the historical development both of emotions and the subject, concerns which continue to impact and shape European culture, literature, and art as we know it today.

The workshop is organized as part of the Emotion and Subjectivity Research Group, based at the University of Amsterdam. For more information or to register, please contact the workshop organizers, Dr. Kristine Johanson (K.A.Johanson@uva.nl) and Dr. Tara MacDonald (T.C.MacDonald@uva.nl).

ACCESS lecture on the history of smell

Holly Dugan, The George Washington University

‘Seeing Smell: Renaissance Pomanders and the History of Perfume’

ACCESS and Graduate School for Humanities, VU University Amsterdam

Friday 28 February, 15.30-17.00hrs, drinks after

VU University, Main Building, Boelelaan 1105, Amsterdam (room 1 E – 24)

Please register below if you would like to attend.

ACCESS is pleased to invite you to a lecture on a synaesthetic approach to sensory history. Holly Dugan will talk about her research into early modern English pomanders and the smell of old books on Friday 28 February.

Come smell the historical odours of pomander and ambergris, with a brief introduction to her collection of historical odours by Rijksmuseum curator and olfactory art historian Caro Verbeek.

In this paper Holly Dugan explores the decorative qualities of early modern English pomanders in order to examine the relationship between early modern perfume and the objects designed to dispense them. Perfume was an important plague preventative in early modern England: because the plague was believed to be an airborne disease—and because outbreaks of plague in England were episodic, sporadic, and uneven—early modern English men and women often carried small, portable perfume dispensers known as pomanders to protect the nose from surprise engagements with foul air. The term itself—pomander—evolved across the fourteenth, fifteenth, and sixteenth centuries from a description of a small ball of aromatic paste to an elaborate metal container designed to hold such pastes and resins. By the sixteenth century, pomanders were so powerful that they were often invoked metaphorically as a spiritual defense.

pomander

In this lecture, Holly Dugan grapples with the synaesthetic paradox of pomanders: visibly small yet powerfully odoriferous, pomanders vex traditional scholarly methods towards material culture. These small, ornate objects were elaborately decorated and exist in a range of forms, including globes, skills, snails, cathedrals, and ships; very few are engraved with the scent ingredients they dispensed.  By examining the complicated relationship between the olfactory aspects of these objects and their decorative materiality, she argues for the usefulness of a synaesthetic approach to understanding of sensory history.

hollyduganHolly Dugan is Associate Professor of English at The George Washington University. Her research and teaching interests explore relationships between history, literature, and material culture. Her scholarship focuses on questions of gender, sexuality, and the boundaries of the body in late medieval and early modern England. In 2011 she published The Ephemeral History of Perfume: Scent and Sense in Early Modern England (Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press).

 

Directions

The lecture is held in room 1E-24 (PKU-room at PThU). The PTHU is located on the first floor of the main building of te VU-university. Please use the main entrance and turn left past the bookshop to take the stairs to the first floor. The E-Wing is past the yellow elevators. Unfortunately, these elevators do not stop on the first floor. If you have any problems in finding the room or are physically unable to use the stairs, please ask the receptionist for help.

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