Conference: Imagineering Violence. Spectacle and Print in the Early Modern Period

poster ITEMP compressedHow can violence be represented and imagined? How can an artist document the violence of the times? What about the numerous ethical implications? When does a spectator become a voyeur? When does violence turn into spectacle? Can violence be aestheticized? Does an artist have a duty to document contemporary violence? These questions saturate modern art, from the horrors of War in Goya to the racial violence in Edward and Nancy Kienholz’s ‘Five Car Stud’. However, they are not new in themselves. The early modern period witnessed a true explosion of images on pain, suffering and violence across painting, print, theater, and public space. The public had plenty to choose from: sieges, executions, massacres: violence fascinated the early modern spectator, yet it simultaneously conjured up numerous questions, some of which are not unlike those posed today.

Together, historians and artists explore the early modern period, looking for new answers on the questions that concern us in the present by means of lectures, artistic presentations, and round table talks. Together, they will investigate how artists in the early modern period dealt with the violence of their time, and whether these age-old answers might shine a light on today’s ‘spectacle society’.

With artistic works by, amongst others,  Stef Lernous van Abattoir Fermé, Simon Pummell, Doina Kraal, Jan Rosseel, Enkidu Khaled, e.a. and lectures by internationally renowned cultural historians such as Jonathan Davies, Katie Hornstein and Benjamin Schmidt.

Find the short program here, and the poster here.

For the Huizinga Institute masterclass by Benjamin Schmidt (currently fully booked, with waiting list), see: https://www.huizingainstituut.nl/masterclass-by-benjamin-schmidt-violent-images-in-the-in-early-modern-period/

Advertisements

Inaugural lecture: Moved by Media and Emotion

Prof. dr. Elly Konijn

On Wednesday 30 September, professor Elly Konijn will give her inaugural lecture at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam on the subject of media and emotions. The lecture (in Dutch) will explore a broad range of media, from theatre to reality soap, from video games to social robots. One of the research projects professor Konijn is involved in is that of sociobot Alice: her research team aims to discover, with the help of community nurses and family, how this care robot should react to and speak with older women to reduce the effects of loneliness. Can people form affective ties with a robot, and can a robot replace a human being?

In her inaugural lecture, professor Konijn makes use of recent research to demonstrate how the emotions aroused by various media can influence people’s actions. She will also show how certain emotions incite people to turn to certain media, or how they subsequently trigger people to engage with these media in their daily lives.

For more information (in Dutch), see the announcement on the website of Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam.

ikbenalice

Alice Cares – the documentary on care robot Alice, developed at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam.