TED talk Caro Verbeek: Inhaling history and smelling the future

ACCESS board member Caro Verbeek gave a TED talk on ‘Inhaling history and smelling the future’ at TEDx Groningen. YouTube cannot do justice to the synaesthetic experience of Caro’s presentation, but the video is certainly worth watching!

Verbeek stresses that due to the increase of social and digital media, there is more need than ever to pay attention to direct and intimate – non transferable – qualities of smell. According to Verbeek it is time to take your nose out of your books, and start inhaling the environment as a meaningful source of information and inspiration.

 

Caro Verbeek is an art and smell historian, curator and author with a focus on modern, olfactory and tactile art. She is currently a PhD candidate at VU University with the project ‘In Search of Scents Lost – Reconstructing the Aromatic Heritage of the Avant-garde’. She teaches the course ‘The Other Senses’ at the Royal Academy of Arts (The Hague) and moderates the monthly ‘Odorama’-platorm at Mediamatic Amsterdam. She curated a show on olfactory art at Villa Rot (Germany) in 2015 and co-curated the Museumnight ‘Ruiken in het Rijks’ (Smelling at the Rijksmuseum) in 2012. She regularly does olfactory interventions at museums and universities worldwide. http://www.caroverbeek.nl

http://tedxgroningen.com/caro-verbeek/

Odorama 6: Smell-blind – the Anosmia edition

Mediamatic, Amsterdam
7th of  april, bites and drinks 18:00, talks 20:00 – 22:00
with Kirsten Jaarsma, Dorien Scheltens and Sanne Boesveldt

Whether derived from nature, or chemically constructed, odourant molecules have the ability to profoundly effect our behaviour, emotions and associations. At Odorama we’ll actively engage with our senses and explore everything that reaches and effects the nose. What happens if you completely lose your sense of smell and become smell-blind? At this edition of Odorama we will discuss the inability to smell.

For more information and tickets: http://www.mediamatic.net/413977/en/smell-blind-anosmia

Anosmia - Imagine being unable to smell the fresh spring flowers. Image from Mediametic.net.

Anosmia –
Imagine being unable to smell the fresh spring flowers.
Image from Mediametic.net.

ACCESS Seminar on cultural specificity of embodied emotions and smell

The Amsterdam Centre for Cross-Disciplinary Emotion and Sensory Studies (ACCESS) organizes a seminar on the:

Cultural specificity of embodied emotions and smell

In this seminar Zhen Pan and Caro Verbeek address the question of the human universality and historical specificity of emotional expression and the experience of smell. Please be welcome to hear, see and inhale!

De reuk, Cornelis Dusart, 1670 – 1704, engraving, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam

De reuk, Cornelis Dusart, 1670 – 1704, engraving, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam

Place:                Meertens Instituut: Joan Muyskenweg 25, Amsterdam

Date:                 Tuesday 22 March 2016

Time:                15.00-17.00

Register:           Please register using the form below this announcement.

Entrance:          Free

Info:                 erika.kuijpers@vu.nl

Program:

Continue reading →

The Deepest Sense

Rembrandt_Harmensz__van_Rijn_-_Het_Joodse_bruidje

On Tactility in the Arts and Sciences from the Early Modern Period to the Present Day. Organized by ACCESS, Meertens Instituut, Huizinga Instituut and Rijksmuseum, June 26th and 27th 2014.

This conference focuses on the experience of art beyond the visual; artists and scientists will make us understand and experience art and history through the sense of touch by embodied imagination and sometimes even by the actual act of touching a replica.

In spite of its important role in daily life, the sense of touch has been neglected in academic debate as it was considered a crude and uncivilized mode of perception. The two-day symposium The Deepest Sense draws attention to our most primary, sensual and thought-provoking sense in relation to history of art, culture and science.

In institutions such as museums, sight seems to be the only way to relate to (often) motionless objects. Yet it is the embodied imagination evoked by sight that makes us feel, caress or suffer and that makes history and its main characters come alive. For centuries, but in particular during the avant-garde, artists intentionally created tactile works of art, in order to experience them in a direct and intimate way.

Internationally acclaimed scientists from the realm of anthropology, psychology, cultural and art history will approach the subject from different angles. Artistic performances and tactile experiments will make the visitor become more aware of their own deepest sense: touch.

Keynote speakers: Constance Classen, David Howes, Garmt Dijksterhuis and Monika Wagner.

Practical information

  • Location day 1: Auditorium Rijksmuseum; Location day 2: Oudemanhuispoort
  • Language of communication: English
  • Registration is mandatory

Conference Program

Preliminary program
Biographies speakers

Registration

Click here to register

Registration fees:

  • € 20
  • Students: € 15

Lunch not included on day 1. Entrance to the museum not included.

Contact information

herman.roodenburg@meertens.knaw.nl

New Dutch emotion research

mona lisa analyzedPeter Lewinski, Marieke Fransen and Ed Tan recently made the headlines with the results of their research into automated facial coding of emotions. ACCESS asked Peter Lewinski to tell us more about his project and he kindly sent us this description of the research.

We welcome news about Dutch emotion research on our website – please contact k[dot]steenbergh[at]vu[dot]nl if you would like to share your project with our community.

MEASURING EMOTIONAL ATTITUDES WITH AUTOMATED FACIAL CODING

Nonverbal communication of emotions

Suppose you want to sell your home-made jewelry at the King’s day in Amsterdam. How can you tell in advance whether people like your necklaces and ear rings? Since the earliest scientific inquiries into preferences the only available method has been to ask people how they feel about them. However psychologists found out that when you are asked about your opinion you tend to become self-aware and start to provide socially desirable answers. In other words self-reports emanate from Daniel Kahneman’s –System 2 and this is as slow and logical as it is conscious System. Questionnaires and interviews capture creations and interpretations led by self and social reflective human judgment. The contents of the fast, emotional and subconscious System 1 have long remained elusive. Even if messages delivered by System 1 are ubiquitous in people’s everyday non-verbal behavior, such as gestures, postures, facial expressions and tone of voice. Decoding the messages has been hampered or even forbidden by the subjective and laborious nature of analyses. In the past decade information technology and artificial intelligence have come to the rescue of the direct measurement of emotions. Hopes are high that we can leave considerable work load required for codification of nonverbal behavior to the computer and so steer away from our own interpretation biases. The research community working on the deciphering of facial movements believes that facial expressions convey interculturally shared core affect signatures. They do not need cross-cultural translation as System 2 responses – notably verbal ones – do. Therefore, in our study, recently published in Journal of Neuroscience, Psychology, and Economics, we investigated the predictive value of facial expressions of emotions in response to amusing – i.e. simply funny – video stimuli. Continue reading →

Call for Papers: Workshop Gender and Silence in Leuven

HUSHED (HI)STORIES OF POWER AND RESILIENCE IN THE FACE OF MODERNITY.

LEUVEN, 7 NOVEMBER 2014 9-16h
Abstract deadline: 1 July 2014

Key-note address: MARIE BUSCATTO (Univ. Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne)

Can silence articulate gender? It seems so insubstantial and eerie – the mere absence of sound. It is easy to forget that silence can consist of an active practice, which is being carried out consciously by numerous actors in the past as well as the present. Active silence has been enforced (“mulier taceat in ecclesia”), used as a means of protest (Turkey’s ‘standing man’s protests) and has been designated as an attribute of dignity or calm. In all those guises, active silence serves as a way to signal the non-speaker’s relation to power, and to underline the corporeal and performative nature of the distribution of (acoustic) authority: female silence in church signaled respect for religious discipline, the ‘standing man’ shows resilience in the face of violence, and dignified silence is a privilege reserved for adults.

This workshop aims to explore the ambiguous relation between practices of silence and gendered identities. Rather than assuming an association between voice and power, and silence and obedience, it seeks to encourage a nuanced analysis of the different ways in which silence has been mobilized or can be mobilized in shaping gendered bodies and behaviors. In teasing out hushed (hi)stories, participants are invited to focus on the perspective of the active non- speaker.

We welcome papers that address issues including (but not limited to) the following:

  • Gendered modes of contemplative silence (monastic or otherwise), discourses and practices of silence and gender in religion and devotion
  • Active silence in contexts of protest, and its gendered meanings and implications
  • Silence as protection (e.g. rapevictims, practices of ‘passing’)
  • Silence and compliance (enforced silence, institutional silence)
  • Representations of gender and silence in literature, art, theatre, (audiovisual) media…
  • Silence and gender in music

Abstracts and papers can be sent in Dutch, English or French. We require participants to hold their oral presentation in English during the workshop.

Interested participants can send an abstract of max.300 words and a short biographical outline by 1 July to josephine.hoegaerts@arts.kuleuven.be

More information in this pdf file